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I read an article entitled “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” by Nicholas Carr. Bluntly, to answer the question, I would say no. But it does seem there is a dark side to Google. The founders of Google, Sergery Brin and Larry Page, have quotes placing their interest in creating an artifical intelligence smarter than humans. Brin even goes so far as to say we would be better off if all the world’s information was attached to our brain. The concept of information as a source of good life is foolish. At the moment, it is also fictional, but most people who think down to Earth, such as author Ray Bradbury, would probably agree the idea is stupid. If that is truly where they plan to take the Google company then we would truly be stupid. The anniversary of Google and the release of Chrome might be a turning point for Google in its effort to change our lives through the use of the net.

An especially special friend of mine spoke with me about the uselessness of primary care physicians. And almost had me, but something came to mind when I read an article in the July 2, 2008 edition of the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) by Dr. Michael Stillman. My friend presented me with the idea that general care physicians are not always very knowledgable about ailments or certain health problems that specialists would know. I had a personal experience that comes under this category. However, when the patient of a primary care physician is ill or injured, the primary care physician will know the patient well. One of the most important aspects of health care that is commonly overlooked is knowing the patient. Often such luxury is not possible with the busy schedule of doctors, or the lack of need to see certain doctors. Nonetheless, it can influence care dramatically. Dr. Stillman gave an example in his article where the medications of a patient had been changed to a more expensive regimen without his knowledge. The prescribing doctor would not have know that the patient could never afford those medications, but Dr. Stillman knew and prescribed the original, less-costly, and equally effective regimen.  A number of other issues come up as well when identifying the importance of primary care physicians. When making an important medical decision, trust between a patient and the doctor becomes essential. Patients, even if are under the care of a specialist may want to consult a phyiscian with whom they are familiar before making an important decision. Primary Care doctors may not necessarily save lifes, but they can certian help people maintain the highest quality of life possible. So with the greatest level of respect possible, I disagree with my friend [I will convince her I am right, and if she happens to read this before I try the art of persuasion…] (citation: JAMA July 2, 2008 p.21-22).