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Tag Archives: mind

I read an article entitled “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” by Nicholas Carr. Bluntly, to answer the question, I would say no. But it does seem there is a dark side to Google. The founders of Google, Sergery Brin and Larry Page, have quotes placing their interest in creating an artifical intelligence smarter than humans. Brin even goes so far as to say we would be better off if all the world’s information was attached to our brain. The concept of information as a source of good life is foolish. At the moment, it is also fictional, but most people who think down to Earth, such as author Ray Bradbury, would probably agree the idea is stupid. If that is truly where they plan to take the Google company then we would truly be stupid. The anniversary of Google and the release of Chrome might be a turning point for Google in its effort to change our lives through the use of the net.

I recently made a Sonic Sez health tip video about seizures and epilepsy. I put good amount of effort into the construction of this video, and I had a fair amount of previous knowledge about the subject which I used. I wanted to project that seizures are not only convulsions, and that many of the causes are unknown.  I had a number of special reasons to learn about seizures, and having read a few books about them I probably know more about seizures than any of the other topics I tackled. The effort I put into this was well worth it from an educational and amusement standpoint (I hand made the set for this video). And of course the video isn’t too serious. I think the intro is enticing for anyone who likes sonic, and I still used a silly saying at the end.

The words of Michael Savage led me to creating another sonic sez (says) video. This time I wanted to contribute to the awareness of Autism. Certainly difficult to understand, a lot of people have misconceptions about what autism is. There is no excuse for what Savage said and my video will hopefully inspire some people to learn about autism. It doesn’t have in-depth information, but I think it suffices for a video done on a whim. The definition I use in the video is from http://www.assew.org/what_is_autism.htm. I think i have a little more humor in this one simply because Savage set himself up to be cracked on.

The Language of the whispering wind lends me a handful of beautiful words;

borrowed and borrowed, I am indebted to the air that has sewn together my poetry.

But is it just to rely on the coming storm to make my emotions flow onto paper?

Without the hurricane my thoughts are limited,

and the stanzas from my mind are dull.

The eye of my poems do not lie within the eye of the hurricane.

I find my perfect outlet in the calamitous wall,

where the wind whispers louder than the shouts of my strongest thoughts.

-By Benjamin Collins

The benefits of exercise are innumerable. Reseachers have discovered that, in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease, exercise helped minimize the progression of the disease. I was not surprised by the findings since exercise seems to keep the mind clear and sharp, but for physically fit Alzheimer’s patients to actually have less brain shrinkage is interesting. It appears that the increased flow of blood to the brain during exercise allows for a healthier brain by delivering more oxygen & nutrients. The connection between exercise and the function of the brain may also point to a future increase of dementia that corresponds with an increase in obesity (citation: WebMD, BBC)

What I Learned From My First Reading Session about Seizures

  • More than 2 million people in the U.S. have had seizures and/or been diagnosed with epilepsy
  • The term seizure is a symptom
  • If a seizure is not epileptic, or if a diagnosis is uncertain, it should be described as paroxysmal
  • There are about 32 types of seizures
  • aprox. 50% of seizures never have an identified cause; the other 50% are usually due to underlying diseases or injury of the brain
  • Seizures limited to one portion of the brain are called partial seizures
  • Most seizures last from 30 seconds to 2 minutes

For a fairly common ‘symptom’ very little is known about seizures. Understanding seizures better could improve the lifestyle of thousands of people. Equally important, it could decrease the amount of fear in people who suffer a seizure and are unsure of why it happened, if it will happen again, or when it could happen. Tests to search for underlying causes can also be quite time consuming and expensive, often including an EEG, CT scan, and an MRI. Each test can be very important in indentifying problems, but the quality of the tests do not seem to meet the needs of epilepsy/seizure patients since only 50% of the time a cause is identified.