Skip navigation

Tag Archives: page

I read an article entitled “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” by Nicholas Carr. Bluntly, to answer the question, I would say no. But it does seem there is a dark side to Google. The founders of Google, Sergery Brin and Larry Page, have quotes placing their interest in creating an artifical intelligence smarter than humans. Brin even goes so far as to say we would be better off if all the world’s information was attached to our brain. The concept of information as a source of good life is foolish. At the moment, it is also fictional, but most people who think down to Earth, such as author Ray Bradbury, would probably agree the idea is stupid. If that is truly where they plan to take the Google company then we would truly be stupid. The anniversary of Google and the release of Chrome might be a turning point for Google in its effort to change our lives through the use of the net.

Advertisements

Citing fiction is merely a round-a-bout process of citing non-fiction. That is, the reference to another person’s thoughts, which are real whether fact or opinion. It is certainly a mistake to believe fiction can give us statistics, but to assume information based on the fictional works of a number of authors is not really different from assuming something based on a yes/no poll. In fact, the former may be more useful in a number of situations since yes/no polls offer no explanations, no additional input, and no interpretation on part of the sample. Reality is much more complex than a simple yes or no, and fiction is deeply embedded in reality.

The idea of citing fiction often can easily be criticized as too abstract. One can only try to understand what an author was truly thinking or what a passage  truly meant. Yet, one reason for citing a literary work of fiction or non-fiction is to back up a statment or presented argument. Words and numbers have a strong history of being pulled out of context or twisted. Other proof, aside from the hard facts, other proof must be coupled to make the strongest argument possible. in this way, fiction can be just as effective. And depending on the audience maybe more so, considering the impact of the fictional styles on human emotion as compared to the raw language often used with words of fact.